Category Archives: Special Needs/Kids of All Abilities

Take A Nature Walk – Make An Instrument!

sistrums-sticksAutumn is such a great time to take a nature walk with your child!  Maybe you have a wooded backyard or a park nearby?  Or perhaps there is a natural area near your home where you can enjoy the changing seasons.

As you take a walk in nature, look for any stick or small branch that’s formed in the shape of a “Y”.   If you find one, you can take it home and make a wonderful little musical instrument that actually dates back to ancient Egypt.

What Is A Sistrum

sistrum-posterSistrums are rattles that are found all over the world.  This clever little percussion instrument starts with some sort of forked object and then has a string or wire running between the two forks. On the strings or wires are objects that rattle and clank, making a lovely noise when shook back and forth.  In ancient Egypt, sistrums was used as part of the Pharaoh’s court and can even be seen pictured in hieroglyphics!

Supplies

Small stick or branch
Sand paper (optional)
Sturdy twine or floral wire
Colorful yarn
Noise-making Objects – buttons, beads, jingles, paper clips,
Recycled noise-making objects – soda tabs, bottle caps, compressed bottle tops (our next post will show you how to make and use these safely to avoid sharp edges).

Start with the Stick!

Once you’ve found a sturdy stick or branch that’s shaped like the letter “Y”, you making-sistrums-peace-valleymight want to take a bit of sandpaper and sand down any rough edges.  Then take the sturdy twine or floral wire and secure it to one side of the “Y”.  Now add any of rattling objects and hold the wire in place without wrapping it on the other side.  Check to see if you like the sound it creates.  If you do, then wrap the wire or twine securely in place.  If not, experiment with adding or removing objects to get the sound you like.

Here’s a hint, less objects often make a more pleasing sound!

Add extra strings of noise-makers if you like.

wooden-sistrumMaking It Unique

After creating the noise-making part of the rattle, you may wish to decorate the handle or the sides with colorful yarn, woven bands, electrical tape or even painting or adding other decorations. This is a very open-ended project and you can be very creative with it!

Learn About The History Of The Sistrum

If you want to tie this project into a study of world cultures, you can check out the Ancient Instruments of the Middle East kids music mini-course.  Or simply have fun with the Egyptian coloring page.  Links and other resources are below.  Happy crafting and music-making!

Links and Resources

Free Coloring Page – Egyptian Sistrum  https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Color-An-Ancient-Egyptian-Rattle-The-Sistrum-2166721

Ancient Instruments of the Middle East  kids music mini-course https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Ancient-Instruments-From-The-Middle-East-Mini-Lesson-2127995

Free Doumbek (Middle Eastern Drum) Poster and Coloring Page https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Middle-Eastern-Drums-Doumbek-Background-Coloring-Page-2049118

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Kaleidoscope Rattles

kaleidoscope rattle and shayHave you ever looked through a kaleidoscope to see an ever-changing array of beautiful colors?

Here’s a fun little rattle that creates a lovely flow of colors when it’s played. And it’s nice and quiet so it’s perfect for music-making with a large group of children or for kids who have noise sensitivity. It’s also one of our favorite projects for creating with kids on the autistic spectrum as it’s fun to make, easy to control and the sound is soothing and not harsh or abrupt.

Here’s what you need to make your own kaleidoscope rattles.

Supplies

Clear Recycled Plastic Bottles (like from water or juice) with a lid
Q-tips
Washable markers
Electric tape (for sealing the rattles)

What To Do

Clean and dry the plastic bottles thoroughly. You can do this easily by rinsing them out and placing them upside down in a regular glass or a jar.

Kaleidoscope Q tipsNext take the washable markers and color the tips of the Q-tips any color that you like.  Color as many as you like and drop them into the bottle.

Every so often, shake the bottle to see if you like the sound. The tone of the rattle will change each time you add another Q-tip to the container!

When you’re satisfied with the array of color and the sound of the rattle, put the lid on and seal it up with electrical tape to keep the contents inside.

Time To Play!

kaleidoscope tableShaking the rattle around in a circular motion displays a wonderful changing series of colors.  But since this is a rattle, you can play it any way you like. Shake it up and down, side to side or get up and dance with it!

Shake it along with a favorite song that you love to sing. Or play along to recorded music. Make several and compare the sounds as well as the colors as you enjoy your handiwork.

Have fun and keep making music!

Ocean Drum From A Pie Box – A Thanksgiving Music Craft

Ocean drum completeWho doesn’t love the soothing sound of the surf?  And who doesn’t have too many pie boxes around this time of year?

Combine those two things and you can have a handy, functional ocean drum made from a few materials found around your home.

What Is An Ocean Drum?

If you haven’t already fallen in love with an ocean drum, it’s a simple frame drum with small round objects between the two heads.  (You’ll get a chance to see and hear one below! ) When you tilt it from side to side, the little objects roll and the sound created is like waves lapping against the shore.  And even our craft version can create the relaxing and hypnotic effect of this quieting drum.

apple pie ocean drum suppliesGather A Few Supplies

Make sure you have a sturdy pie box, then look for whatever you have around your house that is small and round.  Almost any item will work, but objects like seed beads or round “acini de pepe” pasta will sound remarkably like the ocean.  Remember, the smaller and rounder the object, the more it will sound like the surf!

Then check your craft area for any supplies to decorate.  You can leave your pie box plain or feel free to make it unique by adding paint, stickers or other creative design ideas.  In the image at the top of this post, you can see that we painted the sides and added our favorite fishy stickers to keep with the ocean theme.

Add It In, Seal It Up!

ocean drum contents 1When you’ve completed your decoration, add your filling to the drum and see how it sounds.  The sound will change when you add more or less of what you’ve chosen to use, so adjust the contents until you’ve found the perfect sound for you.

Last, seal up with clear tape – packing tape works the best to keep all the tiny objects secure inside the box.

Check out the Real Thing… And A Sturdier Craft Version

Love this drum?  Here’s a short video of a real ocean drum demonstration.  And below is a link to a step-by-step tutorial for a sturdier version made with a packing box.  The larger size and the stronger cardboard make for a more resilient version of this enjoyable musical craft.

Special Kids and Adults And the Ocean Drum

This is one of our favorite crafts for creating with kids and adults of all abilities.  There are dozens of ways to personalize and play it, so these crafty oceans drums have been a bit hit when we are asked to do workshops with our special friends!

polka dot ocean drum kimbertonWe hope you love them, too!

Links and Resources

Ocean Drum Tutorial From The TeachersPayTeachers Site: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Ocean-Drum-Craft-1567951

Earth Day Craft E-Book With 10 Green Crafts (Including The Ocean Drum)  https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Reduce-Reuse-Recycle-Rock-Out-E-Book-With-10-Musical-Activities-653502

Turn a Milk Jug Into a Recycled Shekere

recycled shekeres in classDo you know the three R’s? Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.

How about the four “R’s”?   Reduce, Reuse, Recycle… and Rock Out! While you’re going greener and thinking about reducing or reusing plastic, here’s a fun way to turn large containers into child-size versions of African shekeres.

What’s a Shekere?

I wonder if shekeres were “original recycling projects”. Perhaps someone looked at dried gourds and decided they could be made into musical instruments. To do this, a netting of beads (called a skirt) was crafted around the gourd and small beads, seeds or shells were strung in the fiber to create the sound of the instrument. Most music historians believe the shekere began in West Africa but can now be found with variations in size, beadwork, shape and manner of playing throughout the African continent and around the world.

A Milk Jug Shekere

Since you probably have more plastic containers than cleaned and dried gourds, start by finding an empty milk jug, large water bottle or similar item from your recycling bin. Before you begin, make sure it fits nicely into your child’s hands.

Recycled shekere plus paper to beadBeading With Stickers or Markers

Doing intricate crafts like beading is great fun but takes practice and patience, plus motor skills that can be a difficult for small children. Here’s an easy alternative.

If your container is clear and clean, you can place stickers directly onto the plastic bottle or draw “beads” with markers, making colorful patterns or shapes. If there’s a label on the container, you can cut out a piece of poster board or construction paper to fit the container and lay the paper flat. This makes for easy “sticker beading” and a fun way to explore patterns, shapes and colors with your young child.

If you’re working with a classroom of kids or have a limited time to do this project, you can skip the aspect of trying to “bead” the shekere and allow the kids to simply decorate the outside of the container.

Sounding Good!

mini shekere for storeIn traditional shekeres, the sound comes from the beads or seeds rattling on the outside of the gourd. In our recycled version, we’ll need to add something inside the container to create the sound.   Here are some suggestions for a quieter recycled shekere: sand, salt, sugar, tiny pasta (like acini de pepi), seed beads, Q-tips and paper clips. Here are some fillings you can use to create a louder instrument: pebbles, dried pasta, dried beans, popcorn kernels, marbles or pennies.

Once you’ve filled your shekere and you like the sound it makes. Put the cap on and seal it into place with heavy duty tape to keep this project child-safe.

plastic shekereTime to Play

Although a shekere is a rattle, there’s a lot of different ways you can play it. Here are some playing suggestions:

Hold the handle and shake.

Hold both sides and rattle the contents back and forth.

Hold both sides and toss it gently while twisting it.

Hold it vertically and toss it gently from hand to hand.

Peru_Preschool_ShakureSit a short distance from a friend and toss it back and forth.

With a group of children, sit in a circle and toss it from child to child around the circle.

Try any of the above ideas while singing or while music is playing. Try to shake along to the beat.

Links and Resources

Hear A Shekere

http://www.dariamusic.com/shekere.php

Color a Shekere Online

http://www.dariamusic.com/color_Shekere.php

Bead an African Shekere

https://makingmulticulturalmusic.wordpress.com/2013/12/04/bead-your-own-african-shekere/

2 recycled smilk jug shekeresMake a Classroom Shekere (From A Gourd)

http://tinytappingtoes.wordpress.com/2013/08/05/easy-gourd-shekere-for-a-child-or-a-classroom/

An Alphabet Shekere Game

http://www.trueaimeducation.com/2012/10/guest-post-learning-letters-with-an-alphabet-shekere.html

Sekere.com – Beaded Sekeres from Master Craftswoman, Sara Fabunmi

http://www.sekere.com

Cultural Value of the Shekere, Article By Sara Fabunmi

https://makingmulticulturalmusic.wordpress.com/2011/10/25/the-cultural-value-of-the-sekere/

Make An Earth Day Nature Walk Rattle!

Earth Day Rattle Finished

Take a nature walk and make a musical instrument! Here’s an easy and fun way to recycle a plastic container and spend some quality time outside all at the same time!

Supplies

Clean plastic container (wide-mouthed plastic bottles work best)!

Small amount of sand (or salt or sugar)

Tape (to seal the rattle)

Find A Great Green Space

Can you connect with nature in your front or backyard? If so, head on out and enjoy. If not, there are always parks, play areas, nature sanctuaries and arboretums within a short distance from most homes. And even if you think you know your area, a quick internet search will probably turn up some new places to discover where you can have a picnic or snack, do a nature craft or simply enjoy the great outdoors!

Collect Your Treasures

Bring a small bucket or container to collect your treasures. As you walk, keep an eye out for interesting items such as acorns, nuts, leaves, seeds, seedpods or pinecones. You might come across a feather or small shells if walking by a lake or stream. You may find beautifully shaped rocks or pebbles or smooth sticks that you’d like to collect.

Earth Day Rattle ContentsIf you’re walking at a local park, there are often naturalists who can help you identify what you’ve found or tell you more about what you’ve just collected or discovered.

Make Your Rattle

Start each rattle by pouring in a small amount of sand (or salt or sugar). Then, carefully add each item you’ve chosen to the container. Although you can do this craft without the sand, it will add a soft whooshing sound and then each treasure you add to the bottle will appear and disappear into the sand as you shake the container.

Seal It Up!

Once you are finished, seal up your rattle with a sturdy tape, such as colorful duct tape or electrical tape. It adds a nice design element and keeps small hands from opening the lid and creating a safety hazard.

Play Along To Some Some Earth Day Music!

What does your rattle sound like? Is it soft or loud? Did a friend, sibling or parent make a rattle, too?  Do their rattles look and sound, alike or different?

You can explore all kinds of listening skills with these quiet rattles and they are perfect for paying along with your favorite music. If you’d like some green musical inspiration, play along to the Earth Day anthem on the video below or click the link below for a free download of “We’ve Got The Whole World In Our Hands”.

Links and Resources

Free song download - “We’ve Got The Whole World In Our Handshttp://www.dariamusic.com/earthday.php

14 World Music Instruments That Can Be Made From Recycled Materials https://makingmulticulturalmusic.wordpress.com/2012/04/10/14-world-music-instruments-that-can-be-made-from-recycled-materials/

A Child-Safe Version of Easter Shaker Eggs – Directions in English and Spanish

hands with shaker eggs

Nothing is more fun then playing with those cute little colorful plastic Easter eggs you find at this time of year.

But if you’ve ever tried to reuse them for musical “shaker eggs”, you’ve probably noticed how easily they break or come apart to reveal the tiny items inside that make the percussive sound. The small materials found inside could easily be eaten or become a safety concern for toddlers and young children.

Well, don’t give up on the idea of recycled Easter shaker eggs just yet.  Here’s instructions in Spanish and English on how to create simple hand-held shakers that won’t ever spill or open and can be a part of your family’s musical fun!  The easy step-by-step instructions can be found at the links below.

Still wondering what to do with those plastic egg shells?  We also love this PBS parents post from Salsa Pie that adds two plastic spoons to recycle them into a much safer set of egg maracas.

Make Your Own Recycled Shaker Eggs
http://www.tinytappingtoes.com/babies-and-music/make-your-own-recycled-shaker-eggs/

Haz Tus Propios Huevos Sonajeros Reciclados
https://creciendoconmusicblog.wordpress.com/2013/08/13/haz-tus-propios-huevos-sonajeros-reciclados/

Egg Music Shakers From Salsa Pie (Via PBS Parents)
http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/egg-music-makers/

Best Instruments For Young Children – A “Play By The Numbers” Dulcimer!

can and picks yellowThis simple and satisfying “first instrument” is a lot of fun and  introduces any child or grown-up to the basic skills needed to play any fretted, stringed instrument such as the guitar, ukulele or mandolin.

Play For A Child, With A Child, Or Let The Child Play!

Learning an instrument with a child is a great way to teach them about the learning process.  It can be helpful for a child to see that every person continues to learn throughout their lifetime and how that process works.  Watching you try to play and struggle a bit, then persist, and succeed teaches persistence, patience and determination.  Learning a simple instrument – even with the ups and downs involved – is a great way to bond with a child while building musical skills at the same time!

josef and dulcimerPlay By Numbers

Play-By-Numbers song sheets for the tin can dulcimer or any dulcimer are just as easy as they sound.   Each number corresponds to a “fret”, one of the long spaces you’ll find on the fretboard of your instrument.  To play, push down gently but firmly at the center of each fret and then strum or pluck the string with the other hand.

If the songbook says 2, then press the 2nd fret in the middle and strum until you get a good sound.  Get the picture?  And if you see a “0”, that simply means to pluck or strum the instrument without holding down any fret.

Play By Numbers Songs

Want to start with an easy song?  How about “Mary Had A Little Lamb”?

5   4   3   4   4   5   5    5             4   4   4        5   7   7
Mary Had A little Lamb, Little Lamb, Little Lamb

5   4   3   4           5   5    5
Mary Had A little Lamb,

5        4      4           5      4     3
It’s fleece was white as snow

“Happy Birthday” By The Numbers

Here’s “Happy Birthday” on the Appalachian lap dulcimer.  Numbers for both “Happy Birthday” and “Feliz Cumpleaños”, a Spanish version of that song, are below.

0               1      0      3   2        0           1   0          4    3
Happy Birthday to you.  Happy Birthday to you.

0              7    5          3       2      1                         6     5        3         4     3
Happy Birthday, dear (add their name), Happy Birthday to you.

0             1  0   3  2      0      1   0    4  3
Cumpleaños feliz, te deseamos a ti.

0               7 5  3  2  1   6     5   3  4      3
Cumpleaños felizes, te deseamos a ti.

Have any questions about these instruments?  These are two instruments I really enjoy playing so I’d be happy to answer your questions.  Drop me a line in the comments section below.

Win A Tin Can Dulcimer!

And if you’re reading this during July or August 2014, you can enter to win one of these great little tin can dulcimers on the DARIA MUSIC monthly song page here: http://www.dariamusic.com/monthly_song.php

Links And Resources

Post On The Tin Can Dulcimer
http://www.tinytappingtoes.com/classroom-music/best-first-instruments-for-kids-a-tin-can-dulcimer/

Hear A Dulcimer   
http://www.dariamusic.com/dulcimer.php
Hear A Dulcimer Song   
http://www.dariamusic.com/dulcimer.php
Color A Dulcimer (Online)  
http://www.dariamusic.com/color_Dulcimer.php

Musical Water Play – A MYO Gourd-Style Water Drum

ghana water drumHow often can you imagine someone saying: “Now it’s time to pour water into our drum”.   Although it might seem unusual, at least two cultures from around the globe have discovered that you can make an amazing  drum by overturning a gourd and playing it while it rests gently upon the surface of the water.   In fact, the sound is so deep and resonant that there are claims it can be heard for miles!

Playing water gourd drumDon’t have dried gourds from Ghana or a time machine to travel back to Mayan days and play a bubulek water drum?  No worries. In fact, here’s a simple version of this instrument that also works wonderfully as outdoor water play for kids.  It’s a good way to combine messy or wet play with creativity and music!

Gather A Few Supplies

First you’ll need a shallow container to hold the water. We’ve used a plastic “under-the-bed” storage container box, but a kiddie pool or similar container will also work perfectly.  It helps to have a jug for water so you can vary the amount of water used beneath your “drum”.  Then you need the floating “gourds”.  Circular materials plastic water drumitems (like sturdy round mixing bowls) work best but explore whatever you have that will stay afloat when placed up-side-down in the water. You might be surprised at what sounds each different item will create when tapped or touched.

Lastly, you might want to have a few beaters such as unsharpened pencils, chopsticks or wooden spoons. Then it’s just a matter of pouring and playing away.

Play Gently

With this drum, like many others, less is more.  If you like, start by tapping your “gourd” with the tips of your fingers and see what sounds are created.  Try quietly rapping the plastic water drum playingtop and the sides.  Add a pencil or a beater and see if the sound changes.  Add a different container and play two or three together for different sounds or sound combinations.

Getting Serious?

If you take a look at the video below you can see the musician is doing a few different things. He’s knocking on the top of the gourd (like you might knock at a door), tapping and rapping and creating some really neat patterns. He’s playing an actual “jicara de agua” water drum from Mexico, but the same techniques work perfectly on any homemade drum.

You can use this video for inspiration or create your very own unique way to play.

What will your water play sound like today?

A Music Tree Or Rhythm Clothesline For Outdoor Musical Fun!

rhythm tree - playground

Getting outdoors and making music are two great activities for children of all ages – especially when the weather is wonderful!

If you have a special tree with low branches in your backyard or local park you can easily create a living musical sculpture for outdoor play.  If not, no worries.  Almost any playground, driveway or open space can accommodate a sturdy clothesline that will easily transform into a magnificent musical monstrosity just as easily!

And the best part of this project is that you already have everything you need to create a truly unique music tree or rhythm clothesline right in your garage, home basement and recycling bin!

Gather Your Materials!

If you’re making a musical tree, find some sturdy twine or rope to hand the instruments.

If you’re making a rhythm clothesline, you’ll need a longer, sturdy rope that will reach across your desired area.

A safe, sturdy stepladder

For Both Projects 

Extra string, twine or pipecleaners to attach instruments

Scissors

STARR GARDENS - a few instruments for Rhythm TreeInstruments

We’ll describe a variety of instruments perfect for this project and you can pick out what you want to create.  Or come up with some of your own awesome ideas!

Quick Tips and Suggestions

The pipecleaners help smaller children attach instruments without the need of knot-tying skills.

A basket for mallets keeps the area neat and organized.

If you make the instruments or gather the things you want to hang in advance, this project makes a fun activity for a party, family event or gathering of homeschoolers.

A Recycled Gong!

What better way to start off a musical session than banging a gong.  Take a used serving plate or aluminum turkey roasting pan, decorate and hang for a homemade gong.  (A complete Chinese gong craft is in the resource links below as well).

A Cardboard Roll Guiro

rhythm tree - paper towel roll guiroIf you’ve collected paper towel rolls, you can string them together and create something that looks like an oversized washboard.  Dragging a stick, mallet or whisk over the ridges will result in a wonderful “brrrrrrrrrrrrrrr” sound.

Hang Some Jingling Things

Filling up any clean gallon jugs or similar recycled plastic containers with things that ring or jingle makes a great addition to this project.  Add actual jingle bells; if you have them, or look for pebbles, birdseed, dried macaroni or similar objects that will ring, ding, whoosh or swoosh when the jug is tapped.

Rhythm tree - clothesline instrumentsTap A Tambourine

Do you have any older or almost discarded musical instruments?  Any broken wind chimes?  These sound great when attached to the tree and played.

And The Kitchen Sink?

rhythm tree playing tubeWhat else do you have around the house?  Here we found a large roll used to mold concrete in our garage and put it up so that it could be played like a hanging log drum.  What other items or objects can you find that might make some neat noise?

Make Some Mallets

Obviously, you can tap the instruments hanging from the tree with your hands.  But you can also make some mallets and show the kids how to play each item in new and different ways.  Great mallets can easily be created  from wooden dowels, sticks, unsharpened pencils, chopsticks or similar objects.

tippers yellowMost mallets used in world drumming have some kind of “head”, and this not only creates a better sound but helps kids move away from the concept of poking or hitting with sticks, to the idea of using them as real tools and instruments.

Play The Tree

Kids can get really excited about this project so it helps if the adults or older kids model different ways to play the instruments and encourage the kids to listen and try different techniques instead of just hitting or banging away.  For instance, tapping the gong in different places and in different ways results in distinct sounds.  Using two sticks to play a large tube can create some amazing rhythms.  Tapping different jingling jugs can make a series of different sounds that are like musical notes.

Rhythm Tree drumming aroundDance and Drum, All Around!

And, in addition to instruments hanging up, you can create things like jingle sticks or sistrums made from tree branches to dance and play around the musical sculpture.

Don’t forget that you can also bring or make drums to play beside the tree.  You can create free form rhythms or you can sing and play the tree or clothesline at the same time.  Invite someone who plays guitar or another instrument to come and be part of the fun.  Or bring a music device and play recorded music as a soundtrack for your creative percussion.

Listen, learn and love it!

What different ways will you play?

wooden sistrumResources

Chinese Gong

http://www.dariamusic.com/docs/chinesegong.pdf

Tree Branch Sistrum

http://www.dariamusic.com/docs/naturalsistrum.pdf

Jingle Sticks

http://www.tinytappingtoes.com/classroom-music/easy-may-day-jingle-sticks/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Easy May Day Jingle Sticks

Many cultures celebrate the Spring with music and festivities.   In The British Isles, traditional morris dancers have bells on their legs and sticks in their hands that they use as part of the choreography of the dance.  You can use the same ideas to celebrate the season or as part of music and movement fun; indoors or outdoors, any time or the year.

morris bells on kyraBells and Sticks

We’ll be sharing a post soon about a variety of different dancing bell traditions from various cultures – each with it’s own simple craft versions you can try at home.  For now, if you’re looking for an easy, wearable  “morris bells” craft, check out the resources and links below.

And what do you hold in your hands while dancing?  These bright and colorful jingle sticks are easy to make and fit perfectly in a child’s hands while they are dancing or moving – around a Maypole or during any dancing or movement activity.

morris jingle sticks suppliesA Few Supplies

To make these easy jingle sticks, you’ll need:

Pencils (unsharpened)

Pipecleaners (4 – 8 per stick)

Assorted jingle bells

Ribbon (optional)

morris jingle sticks - pencil and bellWrap it Up!

Start your stick by threading a jingle bell into the middle of a pipecleaner.  Then wrap both sides of the pipecleaner down over the pencil.  Take a second pipecleaner and wrap around the pencil until it is covered, adding jingle bells at regular intervals.  When the pipecleaner is too short to wrap, start with another one and wrap the end of the last one underneath.

Use as many jingles as you like and then tie on pieces of colorful ribbons as streamers, if desired.

morris jingle stick completeWhat Can You Do With Jingle Sticks?

You can use jingle sticks for playing music while seated at a desk in class in school.  You can make a pair and hold one in each hand during any form or movement of free form dance.  You can shake jingle sticks along with the beat of a favorite song.  You can practice, left hand and right hand patterns while listening to recorded music or create left hand and right hand patterns while singing.

Get creative and have fun!

morris jingle sticks 2 sidewaysResources

Easy Morris Bells Craft

http://www.tinytappingtoes.com/early-learning-with-music/easy-morris-dancing-bells-for-children/

Make Your Own Indian-Style Ankle Bells (from Teachers Pay Teachers)

 http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Make-Your-Own-Indian-Style-Ankle-Bells-or-Ghungroo-486879